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Category: Pakistan

The Himalayan Dwellers

“Ever since man entered Asia, through the Nile valley and the fertile Crescent, he crossed the deserts of the Near East, until he came to a barrier of mountains in the North. Some settled there, attracted by the fertile valleys, and in each valley isolated cultures emerged, and numerous different ethnic groups and races developed.These peoples who managed to survive in a hostile world, and who made the most of what nature offered them, are “THE HIMALAYAN DWELLERS”.”

The Himalaya Range or Himalayas for short, meaning “abode of snow” ), is a mountain range in Asia, separating the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau. By extension, it is also the name of a massive mountain system that includes the Karakoram, the Hindu Kush, and other, lesser, ranges that extend out from the Pamir Knot.

The Himalayan mountain system is the planet’s highest and home to the world’s highest peaks, the Eight-thousanders, which include Mount Everest and K2. To comprehend the enormous scale of this mountain range consider that Aconcagua, in the Andes, at 6,962 m (22,841 feet), is the highest peak outside Asia, whereas the Himalayan system includes over 100 mountains exceeding 7,200 meters (23,622 feet).

The Himalayan system, which includes outlying subranges, stretches across six countries: Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, India, Nepal, and Pakistan. Some of the world’s major rivers, the Indus, the Ganges, the Brahmaputra, and the Yangtze, rise in the Himalayas, and their combined drainage basin is home to some 1.3 billion people. The Himalayas have profoundly shaped the cultures of South Asia; many Himalayan peaks are sacred in both Hinduism and Buddhism.

The main Himalaya range runs, west to east, from the Indus river valley to the Brahmaputra river valley, forming an arc 2,400 km long (1,491 miles), which varies in width from 400 km in the western Kashmir-Xinjiang region to 150 km in the eastern Tibet-Arunachal Pradesh region. The range consists of three coextensive sub-ranges, with the northern-most, and highest, known as the Great or Inner Himalayas.

Karachi uncovered

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cottish Actor Atta Yaqub, star of Ken Loach’s controversial film Ae Fond Kiss, goes on a journey to discover the cosmopolitan city of Karachi in Pakistan. Immersing himself in the glamorous world of supermodels and slick TV shows, he finds his misconceptions about the country his parents came from challenged and his opinions changed.

Arriving in the country for the first time in 20 years, Atta gets himself into a press conference for the Lux Style Awards — Pakistan’s equivalent of the Oscars. Befriending A list stars, he finds a country in the grip of a television boom.

At one of the myriad satellite stations broadcasting a diet of music, fashion, and drama he sees how television is influencing the aspirations of modern urbanites. To get in on the act, he tries out for a part in a top drama, but in a toe curling audition, finds his Urdu is not up to scratch.

He meets some young men obsessed with modifying sports cars and asks they think of the more traditional art form of truck modification. Culture, they say, is not interesting for them. Dazzled by the highly skilled workmanship that goes into truck decoration, Atta begins to suspect that modern Pakistan is out of touch with its own traditions.

To investigate further, he tries his hand at modelling. Eager to find out exactly how far girls will go when it comes to flesh content, he meets the country’s top models. However, even the most modern Pakistanis, it seems, are not willing to bear flesh. Being modern he learns, does not mean being western.

Pakistan: The road to Shangri-la

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A legend tells of an utopian kingdom hidden among the towering mountains of inner Asia. A paradise on Earth, yet a place apart. A place of spiritual contentment and eternal life. A place that’s become known to the West as Shangri-La. For century’s romantics, adventurers and the devout risked their lives searching for this heaven on Earth. Many perished in the quest. Those who returned told of a journey through hostile lands, of crossing treacherous mountain passes & desert gorges in their search for a valley where people live for hundreds of years. To this day its whereabouts remains a mystery… David Adams goes in search of Shangri-La in the icy valleys of the Himalaya and Karakoram Mountains in Far North Pakistan. Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the 1933 novel Lost Horizon by British author James Hilton. In the book, “Shangri-La” is a mystical, harmonious valley, gently guided from a lamasery, enclosed in the western end of the Kunlun Mountains. Shangri-La has become synonymous with any earthly paradise but particularly a mythical Himalayan utopia ? a permanently happy land, isolated from the outside world. The word also evokes the imagery of exoticism of the Orient. The story of Shangri-La is based on the concept of Shambhala, a mystical city in Tibetan Buddhist tradition.

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