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Category: India

Amrit – nectar of immortality

«Amrit Nectar of Immortality» is a documentary which was shot at the time of the biggest pilgrim’s festival of the world – the Kumbh Mela – in Haridwar (north India). The film tells the stories of people and their connection with the holy river Ganges. Pilgrims, ascetics, yogis, western emigrants, scientists and environment activists report from their life on the holy river, their belief, the future of the Ganga and the importance of Amrit – the nectar of immortality.
But what is Amrit? Is it a mysterious drank? The holy water of Ganges? Or rather an inner way to the immortality of the soul? The film is a journey in search of answers to these questions, a journey in a strange world, in search of the nectar of immortality.
«He who dwells in the water, and within the water, whom the water does not know, whose body the water is, and who rules the water within, he is your Self (Soul), the ruler within you, the Amrita (the immortal).»

Ajanta caves – India

Astonishingly carved into hillside rock in the middle of nowhere are the Ajanta and Ellora caves. There are 34 caves at Ellora dating from between the 6th and 11th centuries AD, and 29 caves at Ajanta dating back to between the 2nd century BC and 6th century AD.

The caves at Ajanta are all Buddhist, while the caves at Ellora are a mixture of Buddhist, Hindu and Jain.


Ajanta and Ellora Caves – India
Video is hosted on:Youtube.

The first Buddhist cave monuments at Ajanta date from the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. During the Gupta period (5th and 6th centuries A.D.), many more richly decorated caves were added to the original group. The paintings and sculptures of Ajanta, considered masterpieces of Buddhist religious art, have had a considerable artistic influence. The Ajanta Caves (75°40′ N; 20°30′ E) are situated at a distance of 107 km north of Aurangabad, the district headquarters. The caves attained the name from a nearby village named Ajanta located about 12 km. These caves were discovered by an Army Officer in the Madras Regiment of the British Army in 1819 during one of his hunting expeditions. Instantly the discovery became very famous and Ajanta attained a very important tourist destination in the world. The caves, famous for its murals, are the finest surviving examples of Indian art, particularly painting.

The Ellora caves, locally known as ‘Verul Leni’ is located on the Aurangabad-Chalisgaon road at a distance of 30 km north-northwest of Aurangabad, the district headquarters. The name Ellora itself inspires everyone as it represents one of the largest rock-hewn monastic-temple complexes in the entire world. Ellora is also world famous for the largest single monolithic excavation in the world, the great Kailasa (Cave 16). The visit to these caves is enjoyed maximum during monsoon, when every stream is filled with rainwater, and the entire environ is lush green. The monsoon is not only a season of rains in this part, the local visitors are attracted to visit these ideal locations to have a glimpse of the mother nature in full bloom.

INDIA – The Ganges

The Ganges River is the most sacred body of water to Hindus and it is a central part of their religion. Its waters are used most often to purify, but also to aid the dead on their path to heaven. The waters are also life-giving.Discover the importance of Ma Ganga in this spellbinding journey to the Himalayas!
The epic journey to find the source of the Ganges . Reaching the temple of Gangotri – the place where Hindus believe that Ganges first appeared on Earth. The river here is already wide and very powerful and fed by one of the Himalayas’ largest glaciers. To reach the farthest extremity of the river, the determined few journey even higher. Further on we will also trail Kedarnath, Valley of Flowers, Yamunotri and Badrinath.
Nanda Devi is India’s second highest peak and shelters the Bhyander Valley, home to the remarkable Valley of Flowers. Covered in snow for the majority of the year, it is transformed when the snow melts during the short summer and the high meadows become carpeted in spectacular flowers of every colour. Fantastic cinematography from the epic series of Ganges.

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INDIA – The Ganges.

“The Ganga, especially, is the river of India, beloved of her people, round which are intertwined her memories, her hopes and fears, her songs of triumph, her victories and her defeats. She has been a symbol of India’s age-long culture and civilization, ever changing, ever flowing, and yet ever the same Ganga.”

Video hosted on Youtube.

anges Water removes all evil and purifies anything that it touches. It is said that the person who touches Ganges water has all sins removed.

By keeping Ganges water at your home, all negative vibrations will be forced out and Divine Energy will enter. It can be sprinkled in each room of the home and also applied to the top in head. Only a drop each day is needed to see positive results. Use before meditation. The positive energy from the holy water destroys black energy transmitted by ancestors or ghosts from the nether region (Bhuvaloka) and the first region of Hell (Paataal). Constant use of holy water troubles the departed ancestors or lower level ghosts affecting people. When application of Holy water is coupled with spiritual practice , it provides a powerful deterrent to lower level ghosts. Over time the negative entities are forced to leave. In almost all cases, as the average person is affected by their departed ancestors and common ghosts from the first region of Hell, they find sustained relief from problems instigated by these spiritual root causes. The name of the Ganges is known all throughout the land of India. This river that runs for 1,560 miles from the Himalayas all the way to the Bay of Bengal is more than just flowing water. This river is life, purity, and a goddess to the people of India. The river is Ganga Ma, “Mother Ganges.” Her name and her story is known all throughout the land. It is the story of how she poured herself down from heaven upon the ashes of King Sarga’s sons. Her waters would raise them up again to dwell in peace in heaven. Not only that, but anyone who touches these purifying waters even today are said to be cleansed of all sins.

“Mountains of sins accumulated by a sinner in the course of his millions of transmigrations on earth disappear at a mere touch of the sacred Ganga water. Cleansed will he be also, who even breathes some of the air moistened by the holy waters.” – Brahmavaivarta Purana

“By holdong that sacred stream, touching it, and bathing in its waters, one rescues one’s ancestors to the seventh generation”.- Mahabarata

“Thousands of man’s sins get destroyed by the holy sight of the Ganges, and he becomes pure by the touch of the water of Ganges, by consuming it, or just by pronouncing Ganga'” – Gauruda Purana

INDIA The empire of spirit….

Ancient India is with us today in the living tradition of the Hindu religion, the basis of Indian culture. The traditions that are honored by millions of Hindus in the present were born in the Indus valley 5,000 years ago.

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INDIA The empire of spirit Origins of civilization
(Video hosted on Youtube.)

his series of programs examines cultures that have lost their former power, yet have a legacy that continues to influence their descendants. In Legacy: The Origins of Civilization – India, The Empire of the Spirit, host and historian Michael Wood goes to India in search of the civilization that has left behind tantalizing glimpses of its grandeur. Historian Michael Wood stands in the Iraqi desert amid crumbling ruins and dry desolation. He describes a once-thriving metropolis, where merchants brought their goods into the city over a network of lush canals. All that remains is a sea of golden sand, the once-large population drifted away, the complex society vanished. As the world approaches the 21st century, this new series reminds us that other nations and cultures prospered for hundreds or even thousands of years. Now all that remains is the legacy of their civilizations, present and influential in our own. Shot on location on four continents, Legacy takes a different viewpoint from other series that concentrate primarily on the Western view of history. Visiting China, India, Egypt, the Middle East, Greece and Meso-America, this series traces the rise of both Asian and western civilization. This series results from an international effort, a co-production of Maryland Public Television and Central Independent Television, U.K. in association with NHK, Japan and the British Museum.

Road to Hajj – India

Al Jazeera follows pilgrims from India – home to 12 per cent of the world’s Muslims – as they prepare to undertake the Hajj pilgrimage.

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Road to Hajj – India
On the picture: Holi-festival – Holi, also called the Festival of Colors, is a popular Hindu spring festival observed in India, and many other countries around the world. Holi, is celebrated by people throwing colored powder and colored water at each other. Bonfires are lit the day before, also known as Holika Dahan (death of Holika) or Chhoti Holi (little Holi). Holi is celebrated on the full moon day in the month of Phalugna which usually falls in the later part of February or March. In 2009, Holi (Dhulandi) is on 11th March.

(Video hosted on Youtube.)

n a series of special programmes, Al Jazeera follows Muslims from around the world as they embark on the Hajj pilgrimage. The road to Hajj in the Land of the Rising Sun begins with the little known fact that there are ethnic Japanese Muslims. Everyday the call to prayer is made in different corners of the predominantly Buddhist country – unobtrusively within the confines of its 50 or so mosques and approximately 100 musollas or communal prayer rooms. Twenty-six-year-old Kubo-san prays at a small musolla in the agricultural district of Saitama, about two hours outside the capital, Tokyo. Built 15 years ago by Bangladeshi workers, Kubo is the only ethnic Japanese in the congregation. “I was born into a very ordinary Japanese family,” he says. “We did not have a strong sense of religion.” Kubo’s upbringing mirrors that of many Japanese – their attitudes and philosophy towards life shaped by the ancient religion of Shinto. An ancient polytheistic faith, Shinto involves the worship of nature and is unique to Japan. While divination and shamanism is used to gain insights into the unknown, there are no formal scriptures or texts, nor a legacy of priesthood that structures the religion. After the Second World War, Shinto suffered a huge setback when the emperor was forced to denounce his status as a ‘living god’. While many historians would claim that the Japanese people lost their faith after this, recent surveys suggest that at least 85 per cent still profess their belief in both Shintoism and Buddhism.

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