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Category: China

Mount Kailash pilgrimage 2012

The pilgrimage route around Mt Kailash provides a rare insight into the people, ancient practices, traditions and cultures living in one of the last, remote, authentic spiritual sites undisturbed by the modern world. This walk provides magnificent views of all four sides of the mountain which constantly transforms from moment to moment. At times local shepherds herd goats which provide a local supply of yoghurt while yaks graze in the sunshine. Four monasteries lay equi spaced about the mountain providing an insight to a spiritual culture both historic and contemporary.

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Mount Kailash pilgrimage 2012.

Video is copyright to Mazalien 2012

M

ount Kailash and Lake Manasarovar are located in the far west of Tibet 4-5 days drive from Lhasa and at an altitude of over 4000m. The peak of Mt Kailash stands 6,700m high, has never been ascended and remains perpetually covered by snow. Lake Manasarovar is the source of four great rivers Indus, Brahmaputra, Sutlej and Karnali and can be seen glistening in the summer sun like a Turquoise ornament.

Tea Road To The Skies – Tibet

This documentary follow traditional tea caravans from China’s subtropical rainforests to the famous tea market in Lhasa, Tibet – a six-month, 4,000-kilometre journey along the ancient Tea Road. So many horse trains have traveled the route over the centuries that their tracks are beaten deep into the rocks.

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(Video hosted on Youtube.)

urved more than 4,000 tortuous kilometres across 20 mountain chains and two desert plateau’s, spanning four great rivers, and cutting through the territory of 25 different ethnic groups – is the ancient Tea Road. ‘Tea Road to the Skies’ is a series that follows in the footsteps of the caravans which for centuries hauled their baggage of tea along this road and across Asia to be dispersed to the entire world. This annual pilgrimage took 6 months and the path was so well used that the track is beaten deep into the rocks all the way from China to the giant tea market in Lhasa. Learn more about where one of the world’s favourite drinks comes from and revel in the stunning cinematography, all in striking high definition.

The salt men of Tibet

Shot under extreme conditions in one of the world’s most remote and beautiful locations, THE SALTMEN OF TIBET documents the ancient traditions and daily rituals of a Tibetan nomadic community and transports us into a realm untainted by the tides of foreign invasion or encroaching modernity. Step by step we follow the unforgettable, annual three-month pilgrimage to the holy salt lakes of northern Tibet.

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(Video hosted on Youtube.)

n Tibet’s Changtang region, nomads harvest salt to buy barley. A clan prepares four of its men for an annual trek to Lake Tsento, where they rake salt from shoals into piles, then into bags, and onto their yaks to return, 90-days in all. After picking an auspicious day to depart, they feast, sing, tell stories, and race horses. Women are forbidden on this sacred trip. All is ritualized: Margen cooks, Pargen prepares burnt offerings and distributes meat, Zopon cares for the caravan of 160 yaks, Bopsa bends his strong back to arduous work. To each other they speak the secret language of saltmen; they pray and observe exemplary behavior. The goddess of the lake smiles upon them. Four men from a nomadic Tibetan tribe undertake their annual, ritualistic pilgrimage to a sacred salt lake. Salt gathered in this traditional fashion will be sold to provide the economic livelihood of the tribe for the coming year. The journey, necessary for the group’s survival, also incorporates a number of rituals necessary for their culture to survive in the modern world.

Samsara

Samsara is A spiritual love-story set in the majestic landscape of Ladakh, Himalayas. Samsara is a quest; one man’s struggle to find spiritual Enlightenment by renouncing the world. And one woman’s struggle to keep her enlightened love and life in the world. But their destiny turns, twists and comes to a surprise ending…

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Samsara.


Video hosted on Youtube.

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ashi has been raised as a Buddhist monk since age five. When he gets erotic phantasms as an adolescent, his spiritual master decides it’s time to taste profane life, sending him on a journey in the real Himalayan world. Once he is told his hottest dream was real, Tashi decides to leave the monastery and marries Pema, the daughter of a rich farmer, who was actually engaged with local stone-mason Jamayang. The ex-lama soon becomes a rich land-owner himself, and makes a killing from his harvest by bringing it to the city instead of selling at half price to the local merchant Dewa, but half of his next harvest perishes in a fire, yet he comes trough and raises a bright son, Karma. After committing infidelity, contemplated for years, and as he later hears from the promiscuous Indian labourer girl, Tashi reconsiders his life…

A Song for Tibet

Filmed in the Indian Himalayas and in Canada, A Song for Tibet tells the dramatic story of the efforts by Tibetans in exile, including the Dalai Lama, to save their homeland and preserve their heritage against overwhelming odds. Since the invasion of their territory by China in the late 1950s, Tibetans have been struggling for cultural and political survival.

A Song for Tibet

land of snow and mountains, of burgundy-clad monks and prayer wheels–this mythical image of Tibet hides the tragedy of a forgotten people. Since the invasion of their territory by China some forty years ago, Tibetans have been struggling for cultural and political survival in a world surprisingly indifferent to their plight. Filmed in the Indian Himalayas and in Canada, A Song for Tibet tells the dramatic story of the efforts by Tibetans-in-exile, including the Dalai Lama, to save their homeland and preserve their heritage against overwhelming odds.

Shangri La, ‘the Rooftop of the World’ – locked away in its Himalayan fortress, Tibet has long exercised a siren’s hold on the imagination of the West. Tibetans are used to hardship and, despite the disastrous Chinese occupation, they have managed to keep their culture and humour alive.

Although the Tibetan climate is not as harsh as many people imagine, be prepared for sudden drops in temperature at night, particularly in western Tibet. The most pleasant time of year is between May and early November, after which temperatures start to plummet. However, in May and June there is a wind factor to consider and dust storms are not unusual. During July and August you may find roads temporarily washed out along the Friendship Highway to Nepal. These two months usually see around half of Tibet’s annual rainfall.

October is the best time to make a trip out to the east. Lhasa and its environs don’t get really cold until the end of November. Although winter is very cold, many restaurants are shut and snowfalls can sometimes make travel difficult, some travellers swear by these months. There are few travellers about and Lhasa, for example, is crowded with nomads and at its most colourful.

March is a politically sensitive month (the anniversary of the 1959 Tibetan uprising and flight of the Dalai Lama) and there is occasional tightening of restrictions on travellers heading into Tibet at this time. It’s worth trying to make your trip coincide with one of Tibet’s main festivals. Losar (New Year) is an excellent (although cold) time to be in Lhasa. Saga Dawa (April or May) is also a good time to be in Lhasa or Mt Kailash.

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