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Archive for November, 2011

Ralph McTell – Streets Of London


So how can you tell me you’re lonely,
And say for you that the sun don’t shine?
Let me take you by the hand and lead you through the streets of London
I’ll show you something to make you change your mind

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Ralph McTell – Streets Of London.
Video hosted on Youtube.

ondon’s homeless sector got a huge boost with Boris Johnson’s announcement of funding for free dogs and training to improve the forlorn looks modelled by the city’s tramps. ‘It’s fantastic news that the Mayor has stepped up and promised us some real change,’ said Paul who frequents the bus shelters of the West End. ‘The credit crunch has hit everybody, but what with the influx of new talent from the banking sector, the industry just hasn’t been able to keep pace and our livelihoods are at risk. Some of these poor newcomers still have clean shirts and cufflinks – it knocks the investors’ trust to see people like this.’ Under the Mayor’s plans funding for the homeless would be overseen by the newly-formed Tramps for London quango, but sadly they spent all the money on booze.

“Streets of London” is a song written by Ralph McTell. It was first recorded for McTell’s 1969 album Spiral Staircase but was not released in the United Kingdom as a single until 1974. It was his greatest commercial success, reaching number two in the UK singles chart, at one point selling 90,000 copies a day and winning him the Ivor Novello Award and a Silver disc for record sales. The song was inspired by McTell’s experiences busking and hitchhiking throughout Europe, especially in Paris and the individual stories are taken from Parisians – McTell was originally going to the call the song Streets of Paris; eventually London is chosen for its arguably more sonorous name. The song contrasts the common problems of everyday people with those of the homeless, lonely, elderly, ignored and forgotten members of society. McTell left the song off his debut album, Eight Frames a Second, since he regarded it as too depressing, and did not record it until persuaded by his producer Gus Dudgeon, for his second album in 1969. A re-recorded version charted in the Netherlands in April 1972, notching up to #9 the next month. McTell re-recorded it again for the UK single release in 1974.

Have you seen the old man
In the closed-down market
Kicking up the paper,
with his worn out shoes?
In his eyes you see no pride
And held loosely at his side
Yesterday’s paper telling yesterday’s news

So how can you tell me you’re lonely,
And say for you that the sun don’t shine?
Let me take you by the hand and lead you through the streets of London
I’ll show you something to make you change your mind

Have you seen the old girl
Who walks the streets of London
Dirt in her hair and her clothes in rags?
She’s no time for talking,
She just keeps right on walking
Carrying her home in two carrier bags.

In the all night cafe
At a quarter past eleven,
Same old man is sitting there on his own
Looking at the world
Over the rim of his tea-cup,
Each tea last an hour
Then he wanders home alone

And have you seen the old man
Outside the seaman’s mission
Memory fading with
The medal ribbons that he wears.
In our winter city,
The rain cries a little pity
For one more forgotten hero
And a world that doesn’t care

Places that don’t exist – Simon Reeve

Simon Reeve travels to a group of unrecognised nations — countries so obscure they don’t officially exist — in this five-part BBC TV series, shown on BBC2, BBC World and by broadcasters in more than 40 countries.

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Episode One: Somaliland
Episode Two: Transdniestria
Episode Three: South Ossetia
Episode Four: Karabakh
Episode Five: Taiwan

(Video hosted on Youtube.)

n his journey he visits little-known parts of the world including Somaliland, Transniestria, Nagorno-Karabakh, Ajaria, South Ossetia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Somalia, Moldova, Taiwan, and the former Soviet republic of Georgia.
In this series, Simon Reeve is taught to fish by the President of Moldova, becomes an unofficial Somali diplomat, and finds himself crammed into a lift with the President of Georgia.
He visits a little-known country stuck in a Soviet-era time-warp, and a mountainous state which claims to have the highest rate of longevity on the planet. Simon also discovers abandoned missiles capable of destroying skyscrapers, al Qaeda terrorists in an African jail and the mass graves of children killed by soldiers. Simon meets a blonde popstar who’s a crackshot with an AK-47, a mournful guitarist, and a Taiwanese boy band. He climbs the world’s tallest building, visits the site of the battle in Black Hawk Down, is electrocuted in Mogadishu, finds 5,000 year old rock paintings, buys himself a new Somali passport from a man called Mr Big Beard, and is held as a spy by the Transniestrian KGB. Snake blood is on the menu in Asia, rock-hard yoghurt in the Caucuses, camel milk in Africa and two bottles of cognac when Simon is forced to celebrate independence with a Communist politician. He meets a villager who sold a kidney to buy a cow, and children forced to live in freezing railway carriages. Amid the minefields of Nagorno-Karabkh, Simon is pelted with snowballs by refugee children. But in the sweltering heat of Mogadishu he needs a dozen armed gunmen just to stay alive.
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Reviews of the series:
Daily Telegraph: An ‘exemplary series…riveting…eye-opening…remarkable…superb’
Evening Standard (London): ‘Compelling television, lifted way above a worthy travelogue by Reeve’s obvious, sincere interest in the people and places he encounters’
Daily Mail: “Unmissable…makes the blood boil…It would be good if this brave programme stirred a few consciences. Shaming.”
The Times: A ‘consistently informative series…Reeve is an ideal guide — brave without being macho, amused without being frivolous and always informative’
Globe and Mail (Canada): ‘Places That Don’t Exist is outstanding television. That’s because Simon Reeve, the host/reporter, is endlessly curious and incredibly brave. When we last encountered Reeve he was showing us around “the Stans,” countries such as Kazakhstan, that few outsiders visit. It was an excellent series, exceptionally revealing of both the general and specific. Reeve is now one of the great TV figures. A smart and cheerful Englishman, he’s a combination of Michael Palin and serious political reporter.’
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SIMON REEVE is an adventurer, TV presenter and New York Times bestselling author with a passion for travel, current affairs, history, conservation and the environment. He has been around the world three times for the BBC series Equator, Tropic of Capricorn, and Tropic of Cancer, and has travelled extensively in more than 100 countries. Simon’s last journey around the Tropic of Cancer enthralled millions and was described by The Times of London as: “a real gem…Reeve is in a class of his own”. Readers of a leading travel magazine voted it their favourite TV series. Simon, who is an ambassador for the nature conservation organisation WWF, has been awarded a One World Broadcasting Trust award for an “outstanding contribution to greater world understanding”. His books include Tropic of Capricorn (published by BBC Books), and The New Jackals: Ramzi Yousef, Osama bin Laden and the future of terrorism, which warned of a new age of apocalyptic terrorism, and was the first in the world on bin Laden and al Qaeda. Originally published in 1998 it has been a New York Times bestseller. Simon has contributed to other studies into organised crime, terrorism, biological warfare and corruption. His book One Day in September: the story of the 1972 Munich Olympics massacre was published in 2000. The film of the same name, narrated by the actor Michael Douglas, won an Oscar for best feature documentary.
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You can find out more information on Simon’s journeys, and see more of Simon’s films, at his website: www.simonreeve.co.uk or at www.youtube.com/shootandscribble

Simon Reeve’s Equator

For most people the equator is just an imaginary line running 25,000-miles around the globe. But the countries along the equator are among the most troubled on the planet. In this series Simon Reeve takes a journey around the region with the greatest natural biodiversity and perhaps the greatest concentration of human suffering: the equator.

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Episode One: Africa
Episode Two: Asia
Episode Three: South America

(Video hosted on Youtube.)

imon meets illegal loggers, father and son circumcisers, drunk villagers, and a young woman stuck in the baking desert. He is protected by soldiers in a coca field, and UN ‘peace-enforcers’ in a gold mine. Blackmailed and abandoned by drivers in one country, Simon travels through another that has just 300 miles of paved roads — despite being the size of Western Europe. Simon is drenched while white-water rafting, surrounded by a million flamingoes and swallowed by a tidal wave. After being warned about the deadly virus Ebola, he vomits blood and develops a temperature of nearly 40C. Diagnosed with malaria, he’s saved by medicine derived from the Vietnamese sweet wormwood. One remote tribe takes Simon to their sacred monument, while a man from another tribe of former head-hunters decides to make Simon part of the family: Simon is blessed with blood, presented with a short sword, and adopted. Elsewhere, Simon discovers a matrilineal society where daughters are called ‘iron butterflies’, mass graves in the jungle, and islands where protesting fisherman have killed giant tortoises. He helps an orphaned orangutan into a tree, swims with sea-lions, fishes for piranha, climbs the equivalent of half-way up Everest, and discovers the city thought to be most at risk from volcanic eruptions.
Simon’s trip takes him through the nation suffering the worst humanitarian crisis in the Western hemisphere, and the African country that’s endured the most violent conflict on the planet since the Second World War.
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Reviews of the series:
Radio Times: “an extraordinary journey…revelatory…thrilling and thought-provoking…hits us with jaw-dropping facts…eye-opening…delivers a string of revealing snapshots.”
The Sunday Times: “Equator is presented exactly as it should be, with ingenuousness and, at times, incredulity. It showed me stuff I hadn’t previously known or imagined, and did so without condescending, excusing or lecturing. You cannot expect much more from a documentary, frankly.”
TV Times: “fascinating…a real eye-opener”
Daily Mail: “Unmissable…spectacular and thought-provoking. The outlook in many of the countries Reeve passes through may be grim, but Equator somehow manages to be great entertainment.
Mail on Sunday: “Travel reportage at it’s most enthralling. Reeve effortlessly blends political reportage with humour…this travelogue is wholly accessible.” ***** (five stars)
The Observer: “excellent…Reeve is charming, light-hearted and funny, with a good sense of the ridiculous”
————————————
SIMON REEVE is an adventurer, TV presenter and New York Times bestselling author with a passion for travel, current affairs, history, conservation and the environment. He has been around the world three times for the BBC series Equator, Tropic of Capricorn, and Tropic of Cancer, and has travelled extensively in more than 100 countries. Simon’s last journey around the Tropic of Cancer enthralled millions and was described by The Times of London as: “a real gem…Reeve is in a class of his own”. Readers of a leading travel magazine voted it their favourite TV series. Simon, who is an ambassador for the nature conservation organisation WWF, has been awarded a One World Broadcasting Trust award for an “outstanding contribution to greater world understanding”. His books include Tropic of Capricorn (published by BBC Books), and The New Jackals: Ramzi Yousef, Osama bin Laden and the future of terrorism, which warned of a new age of apocalyptic terrorism, and was the first in the world on bin Laden and al Qaeda. Originally published in 1998 it has been a New York Times bestseller. Simon has contributed to other studies into organised crime, terrorism, biological warfare and corruption. His book One Day in September: the story of the 1972 Munich Olympics massacre was published in 2000. The film of the same name, narrated by the actor Michael Douglas, won an Oscar for best feature documentary.
————————————
You can find out more information on Simon’s journeys, and see more of Simon’s films, at his website: www.simonreeve.co.uk or at www.youtube.com/shootandscribble

Walk on, with hope in your heart……


Last night I had a conversation…. and, for the first time since years I reralized that I have to walk on…. and at the end, of the storm, is a golden sky….

When you walk,through a storm
hold your head, up high
and don’t be afraid, of the dark
At the end,of the storm,is a golden sky
and the sweet silver song,of lark.
Walk on, through the wind
walk on, through the rain,
Tho’ your dreams, be tossed and blown
WALK ON,WALK ON,WITH HOPE IN YOUR HEART
AND YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE
YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE
WALK ON,WALK ON,WITH HOPE IN YOUR HEART
AND YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE
YOU’LL NEVER WALK ALONE

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You’ll never walk alone (Celtic supporters).
Video hosted on Youtube.

ou’ll Never Walk Alone is a show tune from the 1945 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel. In the musical, in the second act, Nettie Fowler, the cousin of the female protagonist Julie Jordan, sings “You’ll Never Walk Alone” to comfort and encourage Julie when her husband, Billy Bigelow, the male lead, kills himself to avoid capture during a failed robbery. It is reprised in the final scene to encourage a graduation class of which Louise (Billy and Julie’s daughter) is a member. Billy watches this ceremony during his return to Earth. The song is also sung at association football clubs around the world, where it is performed by a massed chorus of supporters on matchday; this tradition began at Liverpool Football Club in the early 1960s and later spread to several other clubs.

Its a mad world…..

And I find it kinda funny
I find it kinda sad
The dreams in which I’m dying
Are the best I’ve ever had
I find it hard to tell you
I find it hard to take
When people run in circles
It’s a very, very mad world mad world

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Mad World – Gary Jules .
Video hosted on Youtube.

ary Jules (born March 19, 1969 as Gary Jules Aguirre, Jr.) is an American singer-songwriter, best known for his cover of Tears for Fears’ third single “Mad World”, which he recorded together with friend Michael Andrews for the film Donnie Darko. It became the UK Christmas Number One single of 2003. Since then it has been used on popular American TV shows, in a commercial for the critically acclaimed video game Gears of War, an episode of CSI: Las Vegas, and a Season 5 episode of the medical drama House. Some of Jules’ early projects/bands were The Ivory Knights, Our Town Pansies, Woodenfish, Kofi, The Origin, Invisible, No poetry, and Heroes and Heroin.[citation needed] His 2003 residency at the Los Angeles Hotel Café helped develop the venue as a successful singer/songwriter venue. Gary Jules recorded a cover of the song “Mad World” (by Tears For Fears) for the film Donnie Darko and later released it as a single in December 2003. It was a huge success becoming the Christmas No. 1 in the UK. It has also become a popular choice for background music in numerous television dramas.

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