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Archive for December, 2010

Don’t you cry….

Sometimes, when I’m feeling down because nothing seems to be going right, and miss some people dearly I think at Aurora Borealis or listen to Kamelot… both don’t work……

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Don’t you cry…. – Kamelot
(Video hosted on Youtube.)

n northern latitudes, the effect is known as the aurora borealis (or the northern lights), named after the Roman goddess of dawn, Aurora, and the Greek name for the north wind, Boreas, by Pierre Gassendi in 1621. The chance of visibility of the aurora borealis increases with proximity to the North Magnetic Pole[citation needed]. Auroras seen near the magnetic pole may be high overhead, but from farther away, they illuminate the northern horizon as a greenish glow or sometimes a faint red, as if the Sun were rising from an unusual direction. The aurora borealis most often occurs near the equinoxes. The northern lights have had a number of names throughout history. The Cree call this phenomenon the “Dance of the Spirits”. In Europe, in the Middle Ages, the auroras were commonly believed a sign from God (see Wilfried Schröder, Das Phänomen des Polarlichts, Darmstadt 1984). Its southern counterpart, the aurora australis (or the southern lights), has similar properties, but is only visible from high southern latitudes in Antarctica, South America, or Australasia. Australis is the Latin word for “of the South”. Auroras can be spotted throughout the world and on other planets. They are most visible closer to the poles due to the longer periods of darkness and the magnetic field. Modern style guides recommend that the names of meteorological phenomena, such as aurora borealis, be uncapitalized.

Little by little
I’ve come to this point
On my own I’ve been searching my way
I lost you so early
The days went so fast
You don’t know how I prayed every day

A song to remember
A song to forget
You’ll never know how I tried
To make you proud
And to honor your name
But you never told me goodbye

Now that you are gone
Casting shadows from the past
You and all the memories will last

Don’t you cry or suffer over me
I will be waiting for you
Don’t you cry
Angels never fade away
I’ll be watching over you
See you through

Now I’m a man and
I’m feeling you still
Could it be you were there all along
A time to surrender
A time to forgive
With solace I give you this song

Now that you are gone
Casting shadows from the past
In my dreams I hear your voice at last

Don’t you cry or suffer over me
I will be waiting for you
Don’t you cry
Angels never fade away
I’ll be watching over you
See you through

I can see you tonight in the pale winter light
Father and son again
The bond of blood will never end

Don’t you cry or suffer over me
I will be waiting for you
Don’t you cry
Angels never fade away
I’ll be watching over you

Don’t you cry or suffer over me
I will be waiting for you
Don’t you cry
Angels never fade away
I’ll be watching over you

Don’t you cry or suffer over me
I will be waiting for you
Don’t you cry
Angels never fade away
I’ll be watching over you
See you through

Aurora Borealis, Lapland, Finland, 2002

Aurora Borealis, Lapland, Finland, 2002, After four nights in Finland and no northern lights, photographer Diane Cook spotted what she first thought were dancing clouds. She and photographer Len Jenshel shot a light show that lasted 30 minutes. We experienced magic, says Jenshel. —From The Culture of Cool, October 2004, National Geographic Traveler magazine Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

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